Effects Of Different Organic Wastes On The Growth, Yield, Market Quality And Protein Content Of Lentinus Squarrosulus (Mont.) Singer, An Edible Nigerian Mushroom

Effects Of Different Organic Wastes On The Growth, Yield, Market Quality And Protein Content Of Lentinus Squarrosulus (Mont.) Singer, An Edible Nigerian Mushroom.

ABSTRACT  

Four wastes; (Khaya ivorensis) sawdust (MSD), Gmelina aborea  (GSD), oil palm fruit fibre (OPFF) and oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) were evaluated for their effects on growth, yield, quality and protein content of Lentinus squarrosulus (Mont.) Singer.

Plastic bag technology was used with treatments replicated ten times and arranged using a completely randomized design.

The quality of the harvested mushrooms was evaluated on the basis of four pileus diameter size groups (>7 cm, 5-7 cm, 3-5 cm, <3 cm) and a deformed group; while their protein analyses were carried out using Kjeldahl’s method.

on mushroom growth showed that fruit fibre (OPFF) took the least time for full mycelial colonization and the longest time occurred on Gmelina sawdust (GSD).

Analysis of variance showed that there were significant differences (P < 0.05) in the time required for primordia initiation of mushrooms grown on oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB), oil palm fruit fibre (OPFF) and Gmelina sawdust (GSD).

Results on mushroom yield revealed that mean fresh weights of harvested mushrooms varied from 4.12 ± 0.16 g on oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) to 16.05 ± 0.68 g on mahogany sawdust (MSD).

There were significant differences (P < 0.05) in the biological efficiency of mushrooms grown on mahogany sawdust (MSD), Gmelina sawdust (GSD) and oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB).

Mahogany sawdust produced the highest quality mushrooms, with 26% in the >7 cm group while Gmelina sawdust (GSD) and oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) had none in the same quality group. 

See also  The Structure of the Noun Phrase in English and French

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Title Page ……………………………………………………………………….. i
Certification …………………………………………………………………….. ii
Dedication ………………………………………………………………………. iii
Acknowledgements ……………………………………………………………… iv
Table of Content ………………………………………………………………… v
Abstract …………………………………………………………………………..vi
List of Tables ……………………………………………………………………..vii
List of Figures ……………………………………………………………………viii
List of Plates ………………………………………………………………………ix

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION
1.1 Background …………………………………………………………………….1
1.2 Problem Statement ……………………………………………………………..3
1.3 Justification …………………………………………………………………….5
1.4 Objectives of the Study ………………………………………………………..6

CHAPTER TWO: LITERATURE REVIEW …………………………………..7

CHAPTER THREE: MATERIALS AND METHODS
3.1. Sources of Materials ……………………………………………………………12
3.2. Spawn Preparation ……………………………………………………………..12
3.3. Substrate Analysis ……………………………………………………………. 12
3.3.1. Lignin ………………………………………………………………. 12
3.3.2. Cellulose ……………………………………………………………. 13
3.4. Substrate Preparation …………………………………………………………. 13
3.5. Substrate Spawning and Incubation ………………………………………….. 15
3.6. Fruit Body Induction and Harvesting …………………………………………15
3.7. Determination of Mushroom Yield and Biological Efficiency ………………15
3.8. Determination of Mushroom Market Quality………………………………….22
3.9. Protein Analysis …………………………………………………………………22
3.1.0. Experimental Design and Data Analysis …………………………………….23

CHAPTER FOUR: RESULTS ……………………………………………………24

CHAPTER FIVE: DISCUSSION …………………………………………………35

REFERENCES …………………………………………………………………… 43

INTRODUCTION   

Chang and Miles (1992) defined mushroom as a macrofungus with a distinctive fruiting body, which can be either epigenous (growing on or close to ground) or hypogenous (growing under the ground) and large enough to be visible to the naked eye and to be picked up by hand.

Thus, mushrooms need not be only basidiomycetes, or aerial or fleshy, or edible. Mushrooms can be ascomycetes, grow underground, have a non-fleshy texture and need not be edible (Chang, 2008).

Mushrooms are widespread in nature and since earliest recorded history; humans have viewed them as a special kind of food, savoring the delicious flavours and acknowledging the nutritional value of this special group of fungi (Chang and Buswell, 1996).

See also  Assessment of Contents of Selected Junior Secondary School Social Studies Education Textbooks in Kaduna State and Implications For Curriculum Review

Mushrooms have long been appreciated for their flavour and texture, and some for medicinal and tonic attributes. However, recognition that they are nutritionally a very good food and physiologically an important potential source of biologically active compounds of medicinal value is much more recent (Chang, 1996).

It is now known that mushrooms are rich in high quality protein, contain a high proportion of unsaturated fatty acids and have a nucleic acid content low enough to allow daily use as a form of vegetable (Chang, 1996).

Moreover, latter-day application of modern analytical techniques has, in a number of cases, provided a scientific basis for assigning medicinal value through the identification of various mushroom derived compounds including anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunopotentiation, hypocholesterolemia and hepatoprotective agents (Liu et al., 1995).

REFERENCES

Adebayo, G. J., Omolara, B. N. and Toyin, A. E. (2009). Evaluation of yield of oyster
mushroom (Pleurotus pulmonarius) grown on cotton waste and cassava peel. African
Journal of Biotechnology 8 (2): 215-218.
Adenipekun, C. O. (2009). Uses of mushrooms in bioremediation. Proceedings of 2nd African
Conference on Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms. Accra, Ghana. 28pp.
Adenipekun, C. O. and Fasidi, I. O. (2005). Bioremediation of oil polluted soil by Lentinus
subnudus, a Nigerian white rot fungus. African Journal of Biotechnology 4 (8): 796-798.
Adenipekun, C. O. and Lawal, R. (2012). Uses of mushrooms in bioremediation: a review.
Biotechnology and Molecular Biology Review 7 (3): 62-68.
Akinmusire, O. O., Omomowo, I. O. and Oguntoye, S. I. K. (2011). Cultivation performance
of Pleurotus pulmonarius in Maiduguri, North Eastern Nigeria, using wood chippings
and rice straw waste. Advances in Environmental Biology 5 (8): 2091-2094.
Akpaja, E. O., Isikhuemhen, O. S. and Okhuoya, J. A. (2003). Ethnomycology and usage of
edible and medicinal mushrooms among the Igbo people of Nigeria. International
Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms 5: 313-319.
Aletor, V. A. (1995). Compositional studies on edible tropical species of mushrooms. Food
Chemistry 54 (3): 265-268.
Alexander, M. (1994). Biodegradation and Bioremediation (2nd Edition). Academic Press,
San Diego, 121pp.
Ambi, A. A., Pateh, U. U., Sule, M. I. and Nuru, G. F. (2011). Studies on cultivation of some
wild edible mushrooms on some lignocellulosic substrates in main campus, Ahmadu
Bello University, Zaria. International Journal of Pharmaceutical Research and
Innovation 3: 14-18.

SchoolScholar Team.

See also  Pan-Atlantic Undergraduate Scholarship 2022 Application Update

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.